Turkey

Erdogan: “Turkey has no problems related to religious minorities”

And he has a statement from religious minority communities in Turkey to prove it: “We as religious representatives and foundation directors of societies of different religions and beliefs, who have been settled in this country for centuries, are free to follow our beliefs and practices.”

That statement has all the signs of being coerced. The religious minorities in Turkey knew that if they didn’t sign it, they could be subjected to even harsher treatment than they’re receiving already. Over the centuries, dhimmis likewise learned to keep quiet about their plight and even praise their Muslim overlords, for fear that if they didn’t, their situation would get even worse.

It is clear that religious minorities do not enjoy religious freedom in Turkey. The U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF), in its 2018 Annual Report, classified Turkey as a Tier 2 violator of religious freedom – a country in which religious freedom violations are systematic, ongoing, and/or egregious. The ongoing imprisonment of Pastor Andrew Brunson on false pretenses is one example. Another is the harassment of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, and of the Greek Orthodox Christians remaining in Turkey: the Turks closed the only Orthodox seminary in the country in 1971, hamstringing the training of new clergy, has confiscated thousands of properties belonging to the Ecumenical Patriarchate, and refuses even to grant any legal identity to the Ecumenical Patriarchate as such.

But Erdogan has this statement!

“‘No problems’ with religious minorities: Erdogan,” by Muhammet Emin Avundukluoglu, Anadolu Agency, August 1, 2018:

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said on Wednesday that Turkey had no problems with religious minorities in the country.

“Turkey has no problems related to [religious] minorities. Threatening language of the U.S. evangelist, Zionist mentality is unacceptable,” Erdogan told journalists in parliament on Wednesday….

On Tuesday, in a joint declaration, Turkey’s minority community representatives — including followers of the Greek Orthodox and Armenian churches — said that people of different faiths live “freely”.

“We as religious representatives and foundation directors of societies of different religions and beliefs, who have been settled in this country for centuries, are free to follow our beliefs and practices,” the declaration read.

Source: Jihad Watch

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