In Oklahoma, law enforcement agencies across 12 counties took $6 million in cash over a five-year span.

Less than half of the money came from property owners who were charged with a crime.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Oklahoma analyzed records regarding cash seizures that took place in a dozen counties along Interstate 40, which bisects the state. According to the ACLU of Oklahoma’s findings, law enforcement agencies seized $6 million in cash from property owners through civil asset forfeiture from 2009 to 2014. Of the money seized, just $2 million came from property owners who were charged with a crime.

The ACLU of Oklahoma’s findings come as the state prepares to debate reforms to its civil asset forfeiture laws. Civil asset forfeiture is a tool that gives law enforcement the power to seize property and cash if they’re suspected of being connected to a crime.

 In recent years, law enforcement agencies have come under fire for “policing for profit,” which describes a trend of police using civil asset forfeiture to pad agency budgets.