No, Tom Cotton Isn't a Traitor for Writing Iran Letter

“Traitors.” That’s a strong term, obviously. It should never be used lightly. Yet there it was, flying around like confetti in Times Square on New Year’s Eve.

Why? Because 47 Republican senators who are understandably concerned about the prospects of a nuclear-armed Iran sent a letter to that country’s leaders about the deal now being struck with the United States and other countries. Their message: The next U.S. president can overturn “with the stroke of a pen” any deal Congress doesn’t approve.

“Judas got thirty pieces of silver. What did you get?” one New Jersey resident tweeted. Others, sparked by a White House who accused the 47 senators of “wanting to make common cause with the hardliners in Iran,” were equally vitriolic. The New York Daily News called it an “unprecedented missive.”

Vice President Joe Biden echoed this theme: “In 36 years in the United States Senate, I cannot recall another instance in which senators wrote directly to advise another country—much less a longtime foreign adversary—that the president does not have the constitutional authority to reach a meaningful understanding with them.”

No, Tom Cotton Isn’t a Traitor for Writing Iran Letter.