Why Do Two People See the Same Evidence Differently?

J. Warner Wallace:  As a police officer and detective Wallace has been involved in many high profile cold-case trials (four of these have been featured on Dateline.) He has never suffered a loss in any of these trials. People sometimes ask him what the secret to his success is attributed to.  In his experience every case is won or lost at jury selection. You can have the best prosecutor and the best case but if you don’t have the right jury, it’s all for nothing.  As it turns out, every case is dependent on the lack of presuppositional bias. This is what causes people to see the same evidence and come to different conclusions.

I’ve been involved in jury trials for the past 25 years; I can’t even remember how many I’ve testified in as a police officer and detective. More recently (for the past 15 years or so) I’ve been involved in manyhigh profile cold-case trials (four of thesehave been featured on Dateline). We’ve never suffered a loss in any of these trials. People sometimes ask me what the secret to our success has been. Has it been the depth and detail of each investigation? Has it been the meticulous way we assemble each case? Has it been the multi-media approach we take with each trail at the opening statement and closing argument? Has it been the determined way in which the prosecutor puts on the case? All of these things are important, of course, but I don’t think any of them have been the key to our success. In my experience, every case is either won or lost at jury selection. You can have the best possible case and the most articulate prosecutor, but if you don’t have the right jury (free of biases and presuppositions inhibiting their ability to see or accept the truth), it’s all for nothing. As it turns out, every case is dependent on the lack ofpresuppositional bias. This is what causes to people to see the same evidence and come to different conclusions. – See more at: http://coldcasechristianity.com/2014/why-do-two-people-see-the-same-evidence-differently/#sthash.oBB6egqz.dpuf

I’ve been involved in jury trials for the past 25 years; I can’t even remember how many I’ve testified in as a police officer and detective. More recently (for the past 15 years or so) I’ve been involved in many high profile cold-case trials (four of these have been featured on Dateline). We’ve never suffered a loss in any of these trials. People sometimes ask me what the secret to our success has been. Has it been the depth and detail of each investigation? Has it been the meticulous way we assemble each case? Has it been the multi-media approach we take with each trail at the opening statement and closing argument? Has it been the determined way in which the prosecutor puts on the case? All of these things are important, of course, but I don’t think any of them have been the key to our success. In my experience, every case is either won or lost at jury selection. You can have the best possible case and the most articulate prosecutor, but if you don’t have the right jury (free of biases and presuppositions inhibiting their ability to see or accept the truth), it’s all for nothing. As it turns out, every case is dependent on the lack of presuppositional bias. This is what causes to people to see the same evidence and come to different conclusions. – See more at: http://coldcasechristianity.com/2014/why-do-two-people-see-the-same-evidence-differently/#sthash.oBB6egqz.dpuf
I’ve been involved in jury trials for the past 25 years; I can’t even remember how many I’ve testified in as a police officer and detective. More recently (for the past 15 years or so) I’ve been involved in many high profile cold-case trials (four of these have been featured on Dateline). We’ve never suffered a loss in any of these trials. People sometimes ask me what the secret to our success has been. Has it been the depth and detail of each investigation? Has it been the meticulous way we assemble each case? Has it been the multi-media approach we take with each trail at the opening statement and closing argument? Has it been the determined way in which the prosecutor puts on the case? All of these things are important, of course, but I don’t think any of them have been the key to our success. In my experience, every case is either won or lost at jury selection. You can have the best possible case and the most articulate prosecutor, but if you don’t have the right jury (free of biases and presuppositions inhibiting their ability to see or accept the truth), it’s all for nothing. As it turns out, every case is dependent on the lack of presuppositional bias. This is what causes to people to see the same evidence and come to different conclusions. – See more at: http://coldcasechristianity.com/2014/why-do-two-people-see-the-same-evidence-differently/#sthash.oBB6egqz.dpuf
I’ve been involved in jury trials for the past 25 years; I can’t even remember how many I’ve testified in as a police officer and detective. More recently (for the past 15 years or so) I’ve been involved in many high profile cold-case trials (four of these have been featured on Dateline). We’ve never suffered a loss in any of these trials. People sometimes ask me what the secret to our success has been. Has it been the depth and detail of each investigation? Has it been the meticulous way we assemble each case? Has it been the multi-media approach we take with each trail at the opening statement and closing argument? Has it been the determined way in which the prosecutor puts on the case? All of these things are important, of course, but I don’t think any of them have been the key to our success. In my experience, every case is either won or lost at jury selection. You can have the best possible case and the most articulate prosecutor, but if you don’t have the right jury (free of biases and presuppositions inhibiting their ability to see or accept the truth), it’s all for nothing. As it turns out, every case is dependent on the lack of presuppositional bias. This is what causes to people to see the same evidence and come to different conclusions. – See more at: http://coldcasechristianity.com/2014/why-do-two-people-see-the-same-evidence-differently/#sthash.oBB6egqz.dpuf

Why Do Two People See the Same Evidence Differently? | Cold Case Christianity.